Far East

The Geography Of Thought – How Asians and Westerners Think Differently …and Why

Posted by Marion de Groot on August 23, 2008
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When psychologist Richard E. Nisbett showed an animated underwater scene to his American students, they zeroed in on a big fish swimming among smaller fish. Japanese observers instead commented on the background environment — and the different seeings are a clue to profound cognitive differences between Westerners and East Asians. As Nisbett shows in The Geography of Thought, people think about — and even see — the world differently because of differing ecologies, social structures, philosophies, and educational systems that date back to ancient Greece and China. The Geography of Thought documents Professor Nisbett's groundbreaking research in cultural psychology, addressing questions such as: Why did the ancient Chinese excel at algebra and arithmetic, but not geometry, the brilliant achievement of such Greeks as Euclid? Why do East Asians find it so difficult to disentangle an object from its surroundings? Why do Western infants learn nouns more rapidly than verbs, when it is the other way around in East Asia? At a moment in history when the need for cross-cultural understanding and collaboration have never been more important, The Geography of Thought offers both a map to that gulf and a blueprint for a bridge that might be able to span it.

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Creativity: When East meets West

Posted by Marion de Groot on August 23, 2008
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What actually is creativity? And what contributes to its conceptualization and development? For decades, these and other questions have fascinated researchers, educators, parents and laypeople alike, and equally so in the East and West. This interesting collection of articles is an attempt at exploring and answering the above questions from both the Eastern and Western perspectives. Readers may find some answers satisfactory, and others bewildering. This is in fact the reality of creativity research and education. It is hoped that readers will share the joy of reading such a road map.

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Why Asians Are Less Creative Than Westerners

Posted by Marion de Groot on August 23, 2008
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A provocative title. This book compares creativity of East and West. One of its main arguments is that Asians are less creative than their Western counterparts because of their cultural background. A Confucian heritage society suppresses creative behaviour, while Westerners live in a liberal individualistic society that encourages creativity.

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